Dawlish Warren

The Hide on Dawlish Warren

Dawlish Warren on a sunny Saturday autumn afternoon.

We walk out to The Hide, but a low tide means we don’t see many wading birdies: a solitary curlew, a solitary little egret; a flocket of linnets, a couple of crows – and that’s about it.

But it feels snuggly being in this hide drinking homemade lentil and ginger soup looking out on the soggy mudflats of the estuary.

I’m doing my customary clips of films, trying to capture a Golden Medal moment that isn’t quite happening due to lack of bird activity. But it’s feeling ok enough – more Bronze than Gold.

The quiet of the hide hiding us from the exposed basin of The Bight feels becalming.

On the limp back we snapple a few tall reeds for the reed boat Haze wants to make for her Unicorn box.

I’m stroking the noses of docile Shetland ponies.

A pair of swans yap lap green algae off the top of a reedy pond next to the visitor centre.

By 4 it’s just turned towards dimpsy and the day feels done; time to be heading back for buttered crumpets.

Wimbling on The Warren

A warm wimble onto Dawlish Warren this Sunday afternoon.

Over the sand duney path to the Spit at the back overlooking Exmouth. This is where all the serious twitchers come to capture birdies with their big lenses.

I’m waving my spotty Lumix into the air vainly trying to film nesting skylarks; but they disappear too quickly into the blue high sky. To be heard still, but not seen.

This about the best I could do; a still from a film clip

Pair of Skylarks

The pair of them larking about. But far too lively and alive to get stuck in a camera.

This dead sea-bird was better. Probably a gull.

Gulled out

All the meaty bits pecked off it. I don’t lament much for gulls. Too many of them pestering about. The deader the better. One less gull = 2 more of some other bird far more interesting.

While I was hopping about looking for skylarks Haze was sat here

Haze on the Warren 2

Exmouth is there on the other side. A strong swimmer could easily swim across.

Look! – points Haze – theres a seal bobbing its head out of the sea. But it was a bit too far out to get a good look at with the camera.

But walking back along the beach here are some sanderlings skittering in and out of the surf.

Sanderlings

We took our shoes and socks off and dipped our toesies, like a pair of little sanderlings, into the warm sea. Not really a paddle. But refreshing.

Dawlish Warren is good for birds. And rabbits. And Shetland ponies. Will be well worth another visit this summer.